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AICC KPMG Internet of Things (IoT) & Smart Cities Briefing - Monday 20 June 2016

We were delighted to welcome our guests to the AICC KPMG Internet of Things (IoT) & Smart Cities Briefing with:

  • Johanna Pitman, Deputy CEO and Head of Operations for the Committee for Sydney;
  • Beck Dawson, Chief Resilience Officer, City of Sydney;
  • Piers Hogarth-Scott, Director, Digital & IoT Consulting, KPMG and
  • Catherine Caruana-McManus, Director, Giant Ideas.

The purpose of the briefing was to share the vision for Australian cities to succeed in the digital economy and the specific actions required to manage the unprecedented growth that our major cities will experience over the next 20 years. and to hear from leaders across government, community and industry on key local initiatives as well as the global case studies as to the ways in which smart cities and IoT platforms, urban policy and investment are laying the foundation for more productive, sustainable, inclusive and liveable communities. 

Key Insights 

The KPMG Internet of Things (IoT) & Smart Cities Boardroom Briefing bought together Johanna Pitman, Deputy CEO and Head of Operations for the Committee for Sydney; Beck Dawson, Chief Resilience Officer, City of Sydney; Piers Hogarth-Scott, Director, Digital & IoT Consulting, KPMG and mediator Catherine Caruana-McManus, Director, Giant Ideas.

Panellists shared their insights into how Australian cities can better succeed in the digital economy – from looking at managing our fast growing population, to the power of local initiatives, as well as global examples of how IoT platforms, urban policy and investment are laying the foundation for more productive, sustainable, inclusive and liveable communities.  Here are the top 5 insights from the event:

Crunching the numbers

With 62 million people expected to live in Australia by 2100, planning for our smart cities is imperative, and timely. Through IoT, an industry that’s forecast to be a multi-trillion-dollar sector in the space of the next 3 – 4 years, the nation can better plan transport, utility and accommodation solutions that will positively influence the population by better harnessing the explosion of connectivity and data that’s available.

Reality of roadblocks

Governance of cities is hindering the ability to grasp the progressive opportunities that enable smart cities to thrive. The barriers that are presented by structure of ownership and asset management are prohibitive. Silo mentalities need to be broken down before better integration between parties can take place. Structurally, technology help go beyond the boundaries, but collaboration will help to co-ordinate better governance.

Driven by data

There needs to be the provision of access to data by every level of society. By establishing protocol that allows information to be captured and freely available will mean quicker action can be taken to iterate policy and employ technologies to the wider benefit of every community.  Open and shared data is smart city enabling, and can lead to innovation occurring in the community, where everyday citizens create their own value-add to their neighbourhood. 

React and act

Crowd-sourcing initiatives are leading to local momentous change. Community-level projects, which government is getting behind, are great examples of how bottom-up/top-down initiatives drive collaboration in resources, funding and actions that deliver benefits to neighbourhoods. Community contribution and engagement by locals on popular and important issues are paving the way for radical changes that resonates deep on a grass-roots level.

Disruption is productive

Smart parking, smart traffic, car-sharing and other time-saving initiatives inhibited by IoT are delivering increased productivity and are changing the way communities are consuming and living. These new urban offerings are implicating regulations and operations of a city, but for the better. What data is drawn from these programs will help to improve knowledge of accommodation habits, transportation patterns, even how consumables like power can be shared between neighbours. Disruption won’t wait, cities and their populations can experience many positive effect if theirs is the ability to enable new thinking.


Beck Dawson is the Chief Resilience Officer for metropolitan Sydney, hosted by the City of Sydney Council as part of the 100 Resilient Cities Network. Beck leads the development and implementation of the Resilient Sydney Strategy, working with governments, business and the community to identify local responses to global challenges. As a property sustainability expert, Beck's background is in long-term planning and investment in the natural and urban built environments. She was previously the General Manager Corporate Sustainability at Investa Property Group and worked on leading Australian property sector and resilience committees.

Piers Hogarth-Scott is a Director of Digital Consulting at KPMG. Piers is one of the most experienced digital practitioners in Australia with more than 20 years’ experience leading fast growing digital agencies in Asia-Pacific and Europe and has been recognised by Business Age as one of the Top 50 Entrepreneurs in the UK to have made the most significant contribution to the Internet, innovation and wealth creation. Piers’ current focus is assisting organisations develop their digital transformation strategy, and helping to unlock opportunities presented by the Internet of Things with a particular focus on Smart Cities, Smart Transport & Infrastructure and Smart Agriculture.

Johanna Pitman took on the role of Deputy CEO and Head of Operations for the Committee for Sydney in July 2015. Johanna joined the Committee after seven years with NSW Trade & Investment leading the development of industry policy and projects, including the NSW Economic Development Framework, five industry Knowledge Hubs and the very successful Global Talent Hub project in partnership with the Committee for Sydney in 2013 and 2014. Johanna is passionate about initiatives that drive the global competitiveness of Sydney. Johanna has a uniquely global perspective from 12 years studying and working in Japan, Korea, China, Britain, Canada and the USA. Prior to moving to Sydney in 2006, Johanna built experience in management consulting, private equity, trade promotion and investment attraction.

Catherine Caruana-McManus is digital city maker and recognised as one of the Knowledge Nation 100 for her work in big data and smart cities. Catherine is the Founder of Giant Ideas, an advisory business for digital transformation of the built environment as well as a Director of Meshed, an Internet of Things network and integration company. Prior to Giant Ideas, Catherine was the Director of IBM’s Smarter Cities for Australia and New Zealand and has held other executive positions with MC2 Consulting, PMP New Media Limited and Telstra. 







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